Wolverine at his most savage, tearin’ his way through Veloci-raptors and club wielding, spear shaking Neanderthals, dressed in his classic x-men suit to boot.… seriously, what more could you possibly ask for ?! Shrouded in mystery, revolving around ancient tales of what they call the star giant and the dark walker, we have the savage land’s forbidden island, where Wolverine, Shanna the she-devil and Amadeus Cho have all ended up, for reasons still unknown to us and from what I can gather even to them. In this issue the local tribe believe Amadeus Cho to be a god who arrived on their island from the heavens, and are treating him as such, providing their finest “maidens in the village” to serve him as he pleases; 2 of the girls put me in mind of princess Leah I might add! Wolverine is instinctively protecting Shanna the she-devil as they fight their way forward through hoards of savage Neanderthals in a spectacular and full, two page work of art, worthy of hanging in a gallery, or preferably on my living room wall!  Thanks to writer and artist Frank Cho I was kept up to date in the last month’s caption at the start of the comic, and for those already following the savage Wolverine series you’ll be aware of the back story and it’s importance in the ongoing plot. What caught my eye initially was the front cover and it’s artwork, Wolverine looks his very best in his classic suit, yellow and blue with the red trimmings, claws out, veins poppin’ and bounding off the page. The title pops out too making the whole picture very clear to read and gives the whole comic a clean, modern, yet intriguingly retro look, with black, white and blue sketched images in the background, along with the title of this issue “kill island”, giving us a vague impression of what’s to come…

Frank Cho has certainly done Wolverine justice, I am impressed by his figurative work, including not only the womanly curves of the comics female species! But also the way he makes the characters say it all without saying a single word, their body language is extremely clear, giving the characters a transparent quality like no other. These qualities define Cho’s work and really make it stand out from the crowd. The silent but expressive moments in the comic are well timed, along with the panel arrangements, making it all the more enjoyable to read. The colouring is expertly done to reflect on the already  beautiful art work. Each and every character has got a well thought out emotion to express, and this definitely pays off. Lettering is clear, and often bold and to the point, so the story rolls on nicely, but still keeps us guessing.

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Any fan of the marvel universe will be pleased to read the adverts, trust me they’re worth it! And also having a copy of the digital edition is a very nice touch, I’ve got aplaceinspace to thank for my copy! So cheers guys, you’re ace. I thought the cutting edge section at the back of the comic is a great idea, being able to read what people think about the comic, with both good and bad opinions added as a q&a. Good stuff bub! There was one comment that someone made about the belt pouches on Wolverine’s costume, as we are generally clueless as to what they are used for. They pointed out that Savage Wolverine actually found a use for them in a part between Wolverine and Shanna. Myself and my wife also wondered if they were used to carry their house keys around in, ironically enough! Nice to know we were not alone in our thoughts!

Basically, this comic stands out in it’s own unique way; and with the savage fight scenes and rough and tumbles involving Logan, vicious cave men and prehistoric creatures, with a share of ancient tribes and historical importance; I would definitely recommend this to any comic fan. Most enjoyable!

By Dylan “montu” Butcher.

Here are some related links worth checking out:

http://www.comicconventions.co.uk/

http://www.aplaceinspace.co.uk/homepage.html

Jason Keith      colourist.

VC’s Cory Petit    letterer.

Adi Granov      variant cover artist.

Jennifer M. Smith, Joe Quesada, Dan Buckley, Alan Fine, editors.

Frank Cho       writer and artist.